Sunday, October 31, 2010

Pumpkin Quest

The pumpkin pickings were slim at the Trader Joe's in Brookline yesterday, where there'd been a lavish display of fancy and regular pumpkins last week. We decided to try further afield.

We headed to Pemberton Farms, on Mass. Ave. in Cambridge. They had about six pumpkins left. Had we waited too long? Were we about to face a pumpkin-less Halloween?

I couldn't help being worried. After all, Pemberton's yard was already full of potted evergreens, etc., for You-know-what. 

We drove to Wilson Farm and heaved a sigh of relief. They were overflowing with every kind of pumpkin, especially huge ones. They were running a special where you could fill a cart with all the pumpkins it could hold and pay a fixed price.

Here's a photo of their yard, full of hanging witches and scarecrows, moving in the breeze.


Wilson offers several exotic varieties: gray ones known as "blue pumpkins," white, rugged yellow, pale pink, and flattened, brownish "fairy-tale" pumpkins, reminiscent of Cinderella's coach. I didn't have time to catalog all the varieties; I was hunting for a couple of good specimens to bring home. But I had to photograph this eggplant-shaped monster, something I hadn't seen before:


Even more distracting to my photography efforts was our bag of hot, sugar-coated cider donuts, which made my fingers too sticky to use the camera. Before we got them, I'd snapped a few items of interest:





I think that on our next visit, we'll need to try the freshly dipped apples.

My husband chose his carving pumpkin, with a classic with a sturdy, emphatic stem. I settled on two small ones that had worn sunblock throughout  the growing season.  Their unblemished pale skins are so pretty that I may decide not to carve them.

 Snicky, our Halloween cat, is skeptical of white pumpkins

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