Thursday, September 17, 2015

Thanks, Friends

Thank you so much for your thoughtful comments these past few days. I'm still suffering from a bad case of buyer's remorse and it really helps to read your encouraging and sympathetic words, and to hear your own stories.

Please don't hesitate to keep sharing your thoughts on the subject! This is the weirdest psychological experience I've ever had and I'm really struggling to understand it and come to terms with it. It really helps to know that I'm not alone.

10 comments:

  1. It'll take time and work, but you're in (to me) the best situation: a place with fantastic location and "bones", that needs a lot of cosmetic work. (Which is a heckuva lot easier to deal with than moving an entire building from a suburb to the Back Bay.) You've got great taste and years of aesthetic expertise just itching to be put to use…. have fun with it! And remember: we love most what we sacrifice most for. You love the home you have had because you've made it your own; you'll love the new one, too, when you figure out clever, PB-unique solutions to its quirks.

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    1. Ooh, you've hit a bad nail on the head. I don't think it HAS "bones." Our current place has 'em, although they are a bit cramped here and there. The new place has lower ceilings and skinny bedrooms that can barely fit a full-size bed... and some other oddities. I really appreciate your confidence in my quirk-solving abilities, though! Thank you! We shall see....

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    2. Oops, sorry about that. How about this: consult the architectural drawings, find a non-load bearing wall (preferably one that makes one of those rooms so narrow), and take out all your frustrations with a sledgehammer. You'll save money you would have spent having someone else do it, you'll get in a workout, and a catharsis all at once. (Tongue firmly in cheek.) Seriously, though, at least you've got location….and what I'm sure are awe-inspiring quirk-transforming capacities! :)

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  2. You are very much not alone. I am sorry this has been so difficult on you.

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  3. So, let me add a comment. You are stuck with the location - that you love. YAY Everything else you can change.

    Also, many, many years ago (1984), my husband gave up his teaching position in Boston and we moved, along with our two year old daughter and our cat, to Florida. To no house and no jobs. We stayed with my parents for a couple months with all our stuff stored in their garage until we found a house. We weren't wild about it but we loved the location. Jobs were found, house was improved, and now, being back north for family reasons, I miss that house tremendously. I will semi - retire back to the same area some day.

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    1. Thanks for writing. I hope you find another house that you love!

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  4. I totally get what you're going through.

    Here's my two cents on one aspect of this situation. Regarding your current place, forget about painting/repairing/fixing it up. Just put it on the market now, as is. As you're well aware, there's an extreme shortage of homes for sale in Back Bay. It will be snapped up right away. Heck, there might even be a bidding war for it. Once you sell it, you won't be carrying two mortgages at once. That will
    take a lot of pressure off you. The last thing you need right now is more pressure.

    Just my two cents.

    --LR

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    1. It's an intriguing idea.... Our walls and trim aren't in good shape at all, though, and the bedroom, office, and kitchen, at least, would look much better repainted. We're competing with much newer, renovated places. They often don't have the character of our place, but people love clean, fresh-looking spaces. Unfortunately, our agent and stagers want the whole place painted in drab light grays, which I think is wrong.... but I'm old-fashioned. Since all the appliances (whole kitchen, washer-dryer) are 15+ years old, and the bathroom is paneled in cherry (lovely but "unique"), I do feel that spiffing up the walls and going more "neutral" will help us get a better price. I'm told that buyers, probably in a much younger demographic, won't relate to my '90s faux finishes (although every painter who's been here lately loves the living room). I also know that we have too much stuff in here for it to show well, not to mention a couple of extremely outgoing cats who would literally be all over buyers. So we need to move out before we sell. And then we need a stager. I've seen for myself that the difference between an empty space and one with staging is huge. We will leave our rugs and some art here, etc. and do our best to make it pretty, colorful, and less gray... Lots of work and $ and time to do all this. How I wish I could do what you advise! But it feels risky; there are places here in Back Bay that don't sell quickly. But thanks for this food for thought. I will at least talk to some more stagers. Surely gray is jumping the shark by now?

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  5. A morning thought...first and foremost, all will be fine. I remember when my husband and I bought our first home for a whopping $30,100.00. We were panicked at having spent so much! So panicked, I guess, that I remember the amount today. My dad took the edge off by reminding us that the price would seem so little in five years. It did. And now, after 37 years, and a couple big moves, and heaps of inflation...$30,100.00 for a fixer-upper (seriously) sitting on an acre of beauty and half a block from the Atlantic...what a steal it was!

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Unless you are spamming me about, say, Skype, I love getting comments and do my best to follow up if you have a question. I delete ALL spam, attempts to market other websites, and anything nasty or unintelligible. The cats and I thank you for reading — and please do leave a comment that isn't spam, etc.